Star Wars: Women of the Galaxy

Heroes, villains, Sith, Jedi, senators, scoundrels, mothers, mercenaries, artists, pilots and more; you’ll find them all here in author Amy Ratcliffe’s Star Wars: Women of the Galaxy (Abrams Books)!

Covering a wide range of media from live-action films to animated series, comics, novels, and games, the book provides an insightful A to Z of 75 female characters and celebrates their impact on the Star Wars universe and its fandom.

Ratcliffe certainly knows her Star Wars stuff and has a history of writing knowledgeably and talking passionately about the galaxy far, far away for the likes of StarWars.com, Star Wars Insider, the Lattes with Leia podcast, and as a host at Star Wars Celebration.

So, as well as astute commentary on key character moments and thoughts on how these characters have developed over the years, you can also expect fascinating behind-the-scenes information on how the characters were brought to life and insight from the people who played or created them.

Of course, central characters and well-known figures in the Star Wars-verse are all well represented from Leia to Rey, Rose Tico, Phasma, Padmé, and Ahsoka. But there’s also room for less familiar faces such as Lina Graf, the star of the children’s book series Adventures in Wild Space; Rae Sloane, who was introduced in the novel A New Dawn and features in the Aftermath novels; and Kyrsta Agate, also from the Aftermath trilogy.

As for the book’s illustrations, well, they are simply breath-taking; a perfect complement to Ratcliffe’s thorough research and interesting writing. Over 100 original pieces of art-work were created by 18 female and non-binary artists to accompany each of the characters covered. And the illustrations really are an absolute joy to behold: striking, beautiful, dynamic, and in a wonderful variety of styles and palettes, from Jen Bartel’s portraits of Rey and Leia on the front and back covers, to Alice X Zhang’s take on Aayla Secura at the start of the book through to Little Corvus’s illustration of Zam Wesell at the very end.

Final Words: Ratcliffe’s book is a gorgeously designed, delightful dive into the crucial part so many female characters of all types have played in the Star Wars galaxy throughout the decades.

Rating: 4.5 / 5